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<< Those whose lives are illuminated by it are not compulsive consumers. They are not petty, envious of neighbors, neurotically fearful of perceived enemies. They support the development of human potential, not retributive systems of justice and endless war. >> (click HERE for previous point in thread)   Share:  
Thrust of argument: The greatest let down is for Boris, internally. Direction of resistance / implied resistance: Speaking about people like Chomsky (and indeed Corbyn), M.G. Piety tells us:

<<

Why is it hard for us to admit that some people are superior to other people? Is it because we're afraid to awaken the sleeping monster of exploitation that so often lives parasitically on this truth? That's part of it, I believe. Religion can prevent such exploitation, however, even while acknowledging inherent differences among human beings, on the grounds that we are all God's creatures and hence have, despite our differences, equal claim to dignity as such

Even secular humanism can protect people from the exploitation that can come with the recognition that some people are superior to other people on the grounds that no rational, or even merely sentient, creature should ever be treated merely as a means to the ends of others.

The real source, I believe, of our failure to openly acknowledge that all human beings are not, in fact, equal comes not from fear of the evil consequences of such an acknowledgement, but from fear of the good ones. Kierkegaard talks about that, about the fear of what Plato called "the Good." We all have it to some extent or other.

There is a relentlessly leveling dynamic in contemporary Western culture, a desire to tear down, to discredit anyone who dares to rise above the fray. Danes call this Janteloven, or the law of Jante, which can be summed up as: No one should have the temerity to think he is any better than anyone else.

This leveling tendency masquerades as a progressive force, yet it is anything but. The spectacle of greatness is sublime. It elevates us above our petty egoisms, confronts us with the fact that there is something larger and more important than our paltry, individual selves. And this, my friends, is a dangerous, dangerous truth that what I will unfashionably call "the forces of darkness" would rather keep hidden from us.

To glimpse this truth is life changing. Those whose lives are illuminated by it are not compulsive consumers. They are not petty, envious of neighbors, neurotically fearful of perceived enemies. They support the development of human potential, not retributive systems of justice and endless war.

Egalitarianism can be a force for positive social change, but all too often it is a lie designed to keep us down. We need heroes. Martin Luther King may have had his faults, but he was still better than the rest of us, and so, I submit, is Noam Chomsky. There are lots of these superior people. They have always been with us and, thankfully, they always will be. Our lives, and society as a whole, would be made better if we were allowed to openly acknowledge them as such, to celebrate them, to let out a roar at the spectacle of them - from deep within our souls.

>>

 

 

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Removal of resistance: This is all very relevant to the fact that: <<<

I'm an "ex-public-schoolboy" and I have considered one day being an MP or PM, and if I were Boris today, personally I'd feel humiliated. Consider what a real victory can look like: << For the first time in 37 years, we have a Triple-Crown winner. American Pharaoh didn't win by a nose. He won by five and a half lengths! It was thrilling to watch him pull away from a group comprised of the fastest horses on the planet, to see him establish a lead that it was increasingly clear would be impossible for any of the other horses to overcome. It was an elevating spectacle. Joe Draper, wrote in The New York Times that "[t]he fans in a capacity crowd strained on their tiptoes and let our a roar from deep in their souls. It was going to end, finally - this 37-year search for a great racehorse." >>

Winning an amazing battle is an amazing feeling.

Boris spent his life dreaming of being PM.

To be PM you'd have to fight a brave fight, against all odds, and come out on top.

Boris hasn't even been elected PM, and the circs around his becoming 'leader' of a broken government whose majority has been lost - are not the stuff of legends. Read the article by Counterpunch's M.G. Piety below. Boris will never know what it feels like to win an amazing victory. Corbyn, meanwhile, has defeated many Tory PMs already. The party clings on to power pathetically, using blackmail and bribes. The Prime Ministers keep falling, one after the other. Corbyn is invincible. Let the lemmings continue toward the cliff. Go on Boris, lemming along you lemming man.

>>>
Unification: As M.G. piety points out about the truly great ones, like Corbyn, who can do things Johnson literally can only dream of (you'll never become a PM in a spectactular way with people on the edges of their seat, you had your chance and you were Gordon Brittas the Second, Boris my son)..

<< Those whose lives are illuminated by it are not compulsive consumers. They are not petty, envious of neighbors, neurotically fearful of perceived enemies. They support the development of human potential, not retributive systems of justice and endless war. >>
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<< Those whose lives are illuminated by it are not compulsive consumers. They are not petty, envious of neighbors, neurotically fearful of perceived enemies. They support the development of human potential, not retributive systems of justice and endless war. >>

The greatest let down is for Boris, internally.

Speaking about people like Chomsky (and indeed Corbyn), M.G. Piety tells us:

<<

Why is it hard for us to admit that some people are superior to other people? Is it because we're afraid to awaken the sleeping monster of exploitation that so often lives parasitically on this truth? That's part of it, I believe. Religion can prevent such exploitation, however, even while acknowledging inherent differences among human beings, on the grounds that we are all God's creatures and hence have, despite our differences, equal claim to dignity as such

Even secular humanism can protect people from the exploitation that can come with the recognition that some people are superior to other people on the grounds that no rational, or even merely sentient, creature should ever be treated merely as a means to the ends of others.

The real source, I believe, of our failure to openly acknowledge that all human beings are not, in fact, equal comes not from fear of the evil consequences of such an acknowledgement, but from fear of the good ones. Kierkegaard talks about that, about the fear of what Plato called "the Good." We all have it to some extent or other.

There is a relentlessly leveling dynamic in contemporary Western culture, a desire to tear down, to discredit anyone who dares to rise above the fray. Danes call this Janteloven, or the law of Jante, which can be summed up as: No one should have the temerity to think he is any better than anyone else.

This leveling tendency masquerades as a progressive force, yet it is anything but. The spectacle of greatness is sublime. It elevates us above our petty egoisms, confronts us with the fact that there is something larger and more important than our paltry, individual selves. And this, my friends, is a dangerous, dangerous truth that what I will unfashionably call "the forces of darkness" would rather keep hidden from us.

To glimpse this truth is life changing. Those whose lives are illuminated by it are not compulsive consumers. They are not petty, envious of neighbors, neurotically fearful of perceived enemies. They support the development of human potential, not retributive systems of justice and endless war.

Egalitarianism can be a force for positive social change, but all too often it is a lie designed to keep us down. We need heroes. Martin Luther King may have had his faults, but he was still better than the rest of us, and so, I submit, is Noam Chomsky. There are lots of these superior people. They have always been with us and, thankfully, they always will be. Our lives, and society as a whole, would be made better if we were allowed to openly acknowledge them as such, to celebrate them, to let out a roar at the spectacle of them - from deep within our souls.

>>

This is all very relevant to the fact that: <<<

I'm an "ex-public-schoolboy" and I have considered one day being an MP or PM, and if I were Boris today, personally I'd feel humiliated. Consider what a real victory can look like: << For the first time in 37 years, we have a Triple-Crown winner. American Pharaoh didn't win by a nose. He won by five and a half lengths! It was thrilling to watch him pull away from a group comprised of the fastest horses on the planet, to see him establish a lead that it was increasingly clear would be impossible for any of the other horses to overcome. It was an elevating spectacle. Joe Draper, wrote in The New York Times that "[t]he fans in a capacity crowd strained on their tiptoes and let our a roar from deep in their souls. It was going to end, finally - this 37-year search for a great racehorse." >>

Winning an amazing battle is an amazing feeling.

Boris spent his life dreaming of being PM.

To be PM you'd have to fight a brave fight, against all odds, and come out on top.

Boris hasn't even been elected PM, and the circs around his becoming 'leader' of a broken government whose majority has been lost - are not the stuff of legends. Read the article by Counterpunch's M.G. Piety below. Boris will never know what it feels like to win an amazing victory. Corbyn, meanwhile, has defeated many Tory PMs already. The party clings on to power pathetically, using blackmail and bribes. The Prime Ministers keep falling, one after the other. Corbyn is invincible. Let the lemmings continue toward the cliff. Go on Boris, lemming along you lemming man.

>>>


As M.G. piety points out about the truly great ones, like Corbyn, who can do things Johnson literally can only dream of (you'll never become a PM in a spectactular way with people on the edges of their seat, you had your chance and you were Gordon Brittas the Second, Boris my son)..

<< Those whose lives are illuminated by it are not compulsive consumers. They are not petty, envious of neighbors, neurotically fearful of perceived enemies. They support the development of human potential, not retributive systems of justice and endless war. >>



https://www.counterpunch.org/2015/06/09/on-greatness/